Mishpacha, our Family Learning Program, is a nationally-award winning innovative program to experience and learn about Judaism as a family. Think: summer camp but in the synagogue and with a deeper content. Participants enroll in Mishpacha instead of the mid-week Kesher program, but learn similar Jewish content. Mishpacha engages the whole family in Jewish learning.

If you want your children to value being Jewish, come learn alongside them. Parents and children are able to engage in conversation about the values and traditions of our people. Meeting on Sundays twice monthly (usually from 9:00-11:30 am), Mishpacha adults spend time in conversation with Rabbis Paul Kipnes and Julia Weisz on a similar Jewish content that their children are learning in multi-grade groupings. Later, parents and children enjoy in interactive activities to explore the ideas each learned separately. For 4th-6th grade students, Hebrew Tutoring occurs in small groups one hour a week providing in depth Hebrew learning in our Hebrew Tutoring program.

Mishpacha creates a warm, learning environment to support the Jewish values of Mishpacha (family), expand Talmud Torah (Jewish learning), increase Simcha (joyous celebration), participate in Tikkun Olam (fixing the world) and experience Kedusha (holiness/spirituality). Each year, the theme changes, rotating between Torah stories, Jewish values, Celebrating the cycles of our lives, Jewish holidays, Tikkun Olam (social justice), Henaynu (being a caring community), and Tanakh (Hebrew Bible). Families always explore Jewish history, Israel, and social action projects. 

In the coming year, Mishpacha participants will delve deeply into Tikkun Olam (social justice), the Jewish imperative to heal our broken world. Exploring Jewish values connected to social justice, participants will also engage in meaningful social action work.
 

Why We Love(d) Mishpacha 

Family Learning by Kevin and Robin Palm

A Sense of Belonging by Rhonda Gellerman

Mishpacha Learning is Like a Carousel by Kim Gubner

A Reflection on Mishpacha by Barry and Karen Freeman